aspirant - транскрипция, произношение и перевод онлайн

Транскрипция и произношение слова "aspirant" в британском и американском вариантах. Подробный перевод и примеры.

aspirant / претендент, кандидат, соискатель
[ˈæs.pɪ.rənt]
[əˈspaɪ-]
Перевод
имя существительное
претендент
applicant, challenger, contender, pretender, claimant, aspirant
кандидат
candidate, applicant, aspirant, contender, postulant, expectant
соискатель
aspirant
имя прилагательное
честолюбивый
ambitious, aspiring, aspirant
домогающийся
aspirant
Определения
имя прилагательное
(of a person) having ambitions to achieve something, typically to follow a particular career.
an aspirant politician
имя существительное
a person who has ambitions to achieve something.
an aspirant to the throne
Примеры
It is, of course, a convergence powerfully helped by the fact that accession to the European Union requires aspirant states to adhere to the principles of the free movement of capital, services and goods.
By obliging aspirant doctors to take two university degrees, the state would effectively ensure that a medical career is open only to the sons and daughters of the wealthy.
‘This is part of a long dream and an indication to many aspirant youths that coming from the shacks does not mean that one is doomed,’ he said.
Other chapters, conversely, are likely to be concluded or closed only at the last minute since they touch upon core vested interests of current and aspirant member states.
East Dunbartonshire, to the north of Glasgow, is another region where aspirant parents try to send their children to top-performing state schools.
The creation of these late orders of chivalry proliferated in European nations in the 19th century and was emulated by emergent aspirant nations in their spheres of influence.
Lavish profiles of diligent and precocious students - aspirant astronomers, nuclear physicists and even theologians- and their proud parents adorn the newspapers.
These performances are then showcased at a festival to promote aspirant writers.
This process, while exhausting, is rewarding, and may produce answers that surprise both aspirant guideline authors and users.
‘You have a more literate, educated and aspirant population in the working class and they are naturally moving towards either middle-market tabloids or broadsheets,’ he says.